Women’s Rights



Women’s Rights

  • To build leadership and empower women it is often necessary to include a component of public awareness-raising interventions addressing the issue. Such initiatives can range from media & information campaigns, community based approaches, peer-to-peer education of youth, working with community and religious leaders or a mixture of approaches leading to a critical mass of changing social norms and behaviours.
  • GGBK`s Approach:
  • Over the years the interventional focus has moved from mare humanitarian context of care giving for survivors to prevention & implication through mass awareness, individual rights and legal dimensions, hence it needs specialized attention to address the root. Truly supportive and preventive approaches have to include perpetrators, family members and communities in a pro-active manner. It is also necessary to address wider social and cultural norms such as stigma and exclusion, limited livelihood options for survivors, reconciliation and rehabilitation in the context of family, marriage and social structures.
  • Service provision and psychosocial approach: the means and ways to reaching out, types and scopes of intervention, identify the stakeholders, perpetrators and beneficiaries including coordination and reference systems with program frameworks are some of the key elements.
  • Working with Men & Boys: as victims and as perpetrators are allies in the changing attitudes,and play a crucial role in preventing violence addressing gender stereotypes and notions and patterns of (violent) masculinity.
  • Enhancing Govt. Capacities Through Civil Society Mobilization: The govt. bears the primary obligation to protect and strengthen the equal rights of all citizens especially women and children. At the same time the govt. too needs mass support backed by civil society and institutional co-operation to enact laws to ensure prevention, protection and justice.
  • Security and Access to Justice: we need to address the reasons for impunity and the obstacles faced in accessing formal, informal and traditional justice systems that provide security (formal security institutions, communities, families and ensure accountability.
  • Economic Empowerment & Community Education: the endeavor to build a life without violence through creating sustainable means of livelihood for survivors of GBV. There’s a need to develop collective strategies for economic empowerment and community education towards changing community perspective of GBV.
  • Monitoring and Evaluation: Developing tools to ‘monitor’ and ‘measure’ progress and results outcome of our work, lessons learnt from observations at the field levels and the indicators of improvement during and after our intervention, data capture and quantitative and qualitative analysis related to changes and achievements and report the same need to be developed and enforced effectively.



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